Posts Tagged ‘Happiness’

The Long Game

Do you ever have that feeling that everyone else is more successful than you?
If you think that’s bad – try being Leonardo Da Vinci.

This is the first of a two-part series on our distorted view of creativity and success.

The Long Game Part 1: Why Leonardo DaVinci was No Genius

The Long Game Part 2: The Missing Chapter

All of history’s greatest figures achieved success in almost exactly the same way. But rather than celebrating this part of the creative process we ignore it.

This missing chapter in the story of success reveals the secret to doing meaningful work. But in the modern world, full of distraction, do we have what it takes to do great things?

This celebration of youth, coupled with technology, has distorted our perception of time — the world moves faster, and so do our expectations. Today, we want success in seventeen levels, or seventeen minutes, seventeen seconds — and when the promise of something new and better is just a click away, who wants to wait seventeen years? But that’s the thing that connects all of these great people — they played the long game.

All of us have the brain, and the talent, and the creativity to join them. But now, right when it matters, do any of us have the patience?

Read More...

Comments Off on The Long Game

The dark side of positive thinking….

How Positive Psychology/Thinking is Concealing some of the Real Causes of our Collective Suffering

The dark side of positive thinking….

Delusion is dangerous.
Mandatory optimism is dangerous.
Being negative might mean asking important yet unpopular questions.
The alternative to positive thinking is NOT negative thinking.

Read More...

Comments Off on The dark side of positive thinking….

Slomo

Dr. John Kitchin quit a medical career to pursue his passion: skating along the boardwalk of San Diego’s Pacific Beach. He calls himself “Slomo.”

Read More...

Comments Off on Slomo

The Science of Happiness – An Experiment in Gratitude

What makes you happy? Have you ever wondered why? Join us as we take an experimental approach on what makes people happier.

Check out the study here! http://www.ppc.sas.upenn.edu/articleseligman.pdf

Behind the Scenes

Read More...

Comments Off on The Science of Happiness – An Experiment in Gratitude

Life is easy. Why do we make it so hard?

Jon is a farmer from northeastern Thailand.

He founded the Pun Pun Center for Self-reliance, an organic farm outside Chiang Mai, with his wife Peggy Reents in 2003.

Pun Pun doubles as a center for sustainable living and seed production, aiming to bring indigenous and rare seeds back into use.

It regularly hosts training on simple techniques to live more sustainably.

Outside of Pun Pun, Jon is a leader in bringing the natural building movement to Thailand, appearing as a spokesperson on dozens of publications and TV programs for the past 10 years.

He continually strives to find easier ways for people to fulfill their basic needs.

For more information visit http://www.punpunthailand.org

Read More...

Comments Off on Life is easy. Why do we make it so hard?

The Love Competition at Stanford

This is your brain on love.

Can one person experience love more deeply than another? That’s what The Stanford Center for Cognitive and Neurobiological Imaging and filmmaker Brent Hoff set out to understand when they hosted the 1st Annual Love Competition. Seven contestants, ranging from 10 to 75 years of age, took part. And they each spent five minutes in an fMRI machine, thinking deeply about love and allowing the imaging technology to measure activity in their dopamine, serotonin and ocytocin/vasopressin pathways.

If you think this sounds unromantic, you’ll want to reserve judgment.

Via OpenCulture

Read More...

John Lennon Quote

“When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life.

When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up.

I wrote down ‘happy.’

They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.”

– John Lennon

Read More...

Five Ways to Become Happier Today

There are very specific things people can do each day that are proven to increase happiness.

Tal Ben Shahar gives several practical happiness tips, including changing your calendar, buying a notebook, and changing your approach to car parking.

Question: What can people do each day to be happier?

Tal Ben-Shahar: The first thing to do to become happier, paradoxically, is to accept painful emotions, to accept them as a part of being alive. You know, there are two kinds of people who don’t experience painful emotions such as anxiety or disappointment, sadness, envy; two kinds of people who don’t experience these painful emotions. They are the psychopaths and the dead. So if we experience painful emotions at time, it’s actually a good sign. It means that we’re not a psychopath and we’re alive. The paradox is that when we give ourselves the permission to be human, the permission to experience the full gamut of human emotion. We open ourselves up to positive emotions as well.

Question: Are there specific things people can do?

Tal Ben-Shahar: Then I think — yeah. Some specific examples, exactly. The number one predictor of well-being of happiness is time, quality time, we spend with our family, friends, people we care about and who care about us. In our modern world, unfortunately this quality time is erroding. A very good predictor of well-being is what psychologist Tim Kasser calls time affluence. Time affluence is the thing that we have time to sit down and chat with our friends while — not while being on the phone at the same time or text messaging at the same time, being with that person. This is a better predictor.

Physical exercise contributes a great deal to happiness; in fact, there is research showing that regular exercise, three times a week for 30 to 40 minutes of aerobic exercise, could be jogging or walking or aerobics or dancing, three times a week of 30 to 40 minutes of exercise is equivalent to some of our most powerful psychiatric drugs in dealing with depression or sadness or anxiety. We’ve become a sedentary culture where we park our car next to our workplace or take the train and we don’t walk like our fore parents used to. Thousands of years ago our fore parents walked an average of eight miles a day. How far do we walk today? Well it depends on where we park our car. And we pay a high price for it because we weren’t made to be to sedentary. We were made to be physically active.

Question: How can we cultivate gratitude?

Tal Ben-Shahar: There are treasures of happiness all around us and within us. The problem is that we only appreciate them when something terrible happens. Usually when we become sick, we appreciate our health. When we lose someone dear to us, we appreciate our life. And we don’t need to wait. If we cultivate the habit of gratitude we can significantly increase our levels of happiness. So, for example, research by Robert **** and Mike McAuliffe shows that people who keep a gratitude journal, who each night before going to sleep write at least five things for which they are grateful, big things or little things, are happier, more optimistic, more successful, more likely to achieve their goals, physically healthier; it actually strengthens our immune system, and are more generous and benevolent toward others. This is an intervention that takes three minutes a day with significant positive ramifications.

Question: What happiness techniques are particularly important in today’s world?

Tal Ben-Shahar: Okay. Sorry. One of the most important things that we can do in our modern world is to simplify, to do less rather than more. The problem is that we try and cram more and more things into less and less time, and we pay a price. We pay a price in terms of the quality of the work that we do. We also pay a price in terms of the quality of relationships that we enjoy. So doing less — for example, switching our phone off for three hours when we get home, or not responding to every e-mail as it arrives, having what I call e-mail-free zones — these little things, simplifying our lives even slightly, can make a significant difference to our productivity as well as happiness.

Recorded on: September 23, 2009

From: BigThink.com

Read More...

Free Hugs

Sometimes, a hug is all that we need. Free Hugs is the real life controversial story of Juan Mann, a man whose sole mission was to reach out and hug a stranger put a smile on their face.

In this age of social-disconnection most all of us lack that simple human touch from another, the effects of the Free Hugs Campaign are now felt around the globe.

As this simple gesture of kindness and hope spread across the city, police and officials ordered the Free Hugs Campaign BANNED. What we then witnessed was the true spirit of humanity as people came together in what can only be described as something awe inspiring.

In the spirit of the Free Hugs Campaign please pass this video to a friend and HUG a stranger! After all, you CAN make a difference.

The response to this video has been nothing short of overwhelming and touching. Hugs to every single one of you who messaged. There has been thousands of emails from all over the world from people seeking to participate in the Free Hugs Campaign and asking for permission. You don’t need permission. This is the people’s movement, this is *your* movement. With nothing but your bare hands you CAN make a difference.

 

Free Hugs Campaign on TEN News Australia

 

A thank you from Juan Mann and the launch of a new charitable intitiative.

 

Go to:
www.freehelpcampaign.org
www.freehugscampaign.org

 

Free Hugs in Sondrio, Italy

 

Free Hugs Fridays – Boston College

 

“Free Hugs” New York Festivals Award Winning Commercial

Read More...

Daniel Kahneman: The riddle of experience vs. memory

Using examples from vacations to colonoscopies, Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics Daniel Kahneman reveals how our “experiencing selves” and our “remembering selves” perceive happiness differently. This new insight has profound implications for economics, public policy — and our own self-awareness.

About Daniel Kahneman
Widely regarded as the world’s most influential living psychologist, Daniel Kahneman won the Nobel in Economics for his pioneering work in behavioral economics — exploring the irrational ways we make decisions about risk.

Read More...